Reality of rising sea levels

first_imgIn the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy, how will our urban coastal areas deal with the challenge of rising sea levels? And how do we even begin to think about where to start?On Dec. 3, Harvard Law School’s David Barron, J.D. ’94, the Honorable S. William Green Professor of Public Law, addressed some of these questions at a talk sponsored by the Environmental Law Society.No one disputes that urban sea levels are rising, said Barron, who co-taught a class last semester on the urban responses to sea level rise. The challenge, he says, is in planning for frequent and intense flooding in places that don’t normally experience it. When people talk about solutions, they usually focus on planning or engineering, he said. But we also need to think about how the solutions will be implemented.Barron discussed a range of ideas, each presenting its own challenges. The first approach he called “retreat” — forbidding development in newly designated flood zones and moving people out of the area. But who makes those decisions? The state or city? And how realistic is this approach in heavily populated areas, he asked, citing the example of post-Katrina New Orleans, where many people have stayed, and where there are no plans to relocate them.He looked to Providence, R.I., for the example of another solution. The Fox Point Hurricane Barrier was built in the 1960s after two hurricanes flooded and seriously damaged Providence. But he pointed out that the hurricane barrier was completed before the implementation of environmental regulations, which now require stakeholder involvement and environmental impact assessments.He also described “green solutions,” such as creating barrier islands and developing wetlands and oyster beds to absorb the impact of flooding and storm surges. But these options are expensive, he said, and there’s the question of how they would be paid for.Finally, there is what Barron called “resilience planning,” which involves designing a city with flooding in mind. Preventive measures might include permeable streets, not using the first floors of buildings, and adapting public transportation. But who would make these decisions, he asked? The answers vary from place to place, he observed. For example, New York City has autonomy over its building codes, but Boston’s codes are subject to state approval.These are not just challenges of planning, designing, or engineering, Barron said. They are political and governance problems. And there is an enormous vacuum in governance in addressing these issues, he added. “This is the thing that is least talked about or considered in the wake of Sandy,” said Barron. “Given what’s going on with the current budget negotiations, it’s hard to think of the United States right now existing in a moment in which large-scale planning can be successfully accomplished. But what something like urban sea level rise demands is large-scale planning, chiefly at a national level.”Until then, Barron said, the absence of governance might at least mean there will be opportunities for law students and graduates to tackle these issues by working in local government, especially in new sustainability offices — and thus opportunities to influence how the federal government will rise to the challenge of rising urban sea levels.last_img read more

Drug Cartels, Armed Groups Pose Grave Threat To Indigenous Rights

first_imgBy Dialogo September 22, 2011 Drug traffickers and irregular armed groups pose the greatest threat to indigenous groups in parts of Latin America, a UN expert on native rights told reporters. “In the case of drug traffickers or narcotraffickers and irregular or paramilitary forces, in many places those are the major threat to indigenous peoples,” The UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples James Anaya said. “Of course this has been a problem in Colombia, with not just the drug cartels but also the irregular forces that exist in that country,” he said. “The constitutional court itself has declared that because of these forces on the ground, despite protection under Colombian law, and protections in the Colombian constitution, there are numerous indigenous peoples that are in threat of extinction,” Anaya said. The UN expert added that similar patterns were also being observed in parts of Central America, Peru and Mexico. He also gave the example of Brazil, where according to Anaya, large scale farmers use private security forces to remove indigenous people “who are reoccupying their traditional territories that are now within … areas titled to the farmer.” “The real threat there is from these kinds of irregular forces in the midst of a vacuum of effective government power. “It is a very serious situation,” he added.last_img read more

Assistant professor at Binghamton University explains how you can prevent an opioid overdose

first_imgThe drug is not a magic fix. Doughty says you must call 9-11 immediately after administering the drug because the individual could re overdose after a period of between thirty minutes and two hours. VESTAL (WBNG) — When it comes to fighting the ongoing opioid epidemic, experts at Binghamton University are urging everyone to step up and help. Bennett says you can help by carrying Naloxone, a drug that can treat an overdose in an emergency situation. “Whoever finds themselves in this situation hopefully there’s someone who carries Naloxone on them who can help in reversing this potentially deadly situation,” he said. center_img “People are trying to avoid it because of the stigma or not talk about it but really try to understand that it’s a disease and it affects everyone and we really can have an impact on that” said Bennett Doughty, Clinical Assistant Professor at the university’s School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science. “Naloxone is like a life vest it’s not saving us from the actual situation of opioid overdose disorder but it’s giving us more time if we are in an overdose situation to get that next treatment” Doughty said.last_img read more

Declaration of Wright

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Trump agrees to send Indonesia medical supplies following call with Jokowi

first_imgThe United States has agreed to supply Indonesia with medical equipment, including ventilators, for its battle with COVID-19, following a phone call between President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo and his US counterpart Donald Trump.Trump tweeted on Friday evening Jakarta time that he had spoken with Jokowi – whom he called “my friend” – about possible cooperation between Indonesia and the US regarding medical supplies.“Just spoke to my friend, President Joko Widodo of the Republic of Indonesia. Asking for Ventilators, which we will provide,” the US president tweeted.Just spoke to my friend, President Joko Widodo of the Republic of Indonesia. Asking for Ventilators, which we will provide. Great cooperation between us!— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 24, 2020 Jakarta confirmed that the phone call took place, with the two leaders discussing handling of the COVID-19 outbreak, including Indonesia’s lack of medical supplies such, as personal protective equipment and face masks.“President Trump spoke about his country’s efforts to produce ventilators and said he would send equipment to Indonesia once it is ready. This cooperation will be overseen by each country’s respective teams,” read a statement issued by the State Palace press bureau on Saturday.Read also: ‘Trouble shared is…’: South Korea’s Moon conveys support for Jokowi against COVID-19Jokowi and Trump also agreed to strengthen economic cooperation and trade to help restore the global economy.“Indonesia is an important country for the US. We should maintain this cooperation,” said Trump, as quoted by the press bureau.Topics :last_img read more

Trump’s clemency for Roger Stone wipes away fine and supervised release

first_imgPresident Donald Trump’s executive clemency to his longtime friend and adviser Roger Stone not only commuted the veteran Republican operative’s prison term but it also spared him a hefty fine and two years of supervised release.The details of the clemency arrangement were made public by the Justice Department and Stone’s lawyer on Monday after the judge who presided over the case asked the Trump administration to explain whether the commutation announced on Friday meant he would not be supervised, as many convicted felons are after being freed.US District Judge Amy Berman Jackson had set a Tuesday deadline to receive a copy of Trump’s clemency order along with an explanation about whether it also commuted the period Stone was meant to be supervised after leaving prison. Topics : “I commute the entirety of the prison sentence imposed upon the said Roger Stone, Jr. to expire immediately,” according to Trump’s order.”I also commute the entirety of the two-year term of supervised released with all its conditions, and finally, I remit any unpaid balance of the $20,000 fine imposed.”Congressional Democrats and other critics have accused Trump of abuse of power and an assault on the rule of law.Stone, 67, was sentenced to three years and four months in prison after being convicted by a jury in Washington last year of lying under oath to lawmakers investigating Russian interference in the 2016 US election. Stone was found guilty of all seven counts against him. The commutation did not erase Stone’s conviction as a pardon would have.center_img Stone was due to have reported to a federal prison in Georgia on Tuesday. Trump’s action marked his most assertive intervention to protect an associate in a criminal case and his latest use of executive clemency to benefit an ally.Stone’s attorney Grant Smith, who tweeted out a copy of Trump’s order, said it speaks for itself in answering the judge’s inquiry.last_img read more

Brisbane acreage nabs street record as semirural properties see big lift

first_img70 Mount O’Reilly Road, Samford Valley, Qld 4520. Picture: Realestate.com.auThe property had been marketed by Deborah Bowden of Craig Doyle Real Estate as a three-storey dual living residence.Among its features was a one bedroom granny flat with bathroom, kitchenette and veranda. It also has a saltwater pool with alfresco area, 1.5 acres of fenced land, a shed and established gardens. The highest price fetched across Samford Valley is $2.015m – and the only $2m-plus sale – at 5 Cannington Court four years ago. 70 Mount O’Reilly Road, Samford Valley, Qld 4520. Picture: Realestate.com.auA BRISBANE acreage property may be one of the few to sell in its suburb in recent weeks, but it has landed a record price for its street.The four bedroom home at 70 Mount O’Reilly Road, Samford Valley, sold for $1 million in a suburb where the median price in the past 12 months was $935,000. 70 Mount O’Reilly Road, Samford Valley, Qld 4520. Picture: Realestate.com.auMore from newsFor under $10m you can buy a luxurious home with a two-lane bowling alley5 Apr 2017Military and railway history come together on bush block24 Apr 2019 70 Mount O’Reilly Road, Samford Valley, Qld 4520. Picture: Realestate.com.au 70 Mount O’Reilly Road, Samford Valley, Qld 4520. Picture: Realestate.com.auThe street has been steadily trending towards seven digits in the past few years, with the highest prices fetched before this sale being $951,000 at 76 Mount O’Reilly Road and $925,000 at number 41. The area is classified as a high demand suburb with 709 visits per property compared to the 288 Queensland average, according to Realestate.com.au.last_img read more

Slice of paradise at Banksia Beach sells for more than $1m

first_img42 Island Parade, Banksia BeachAN architecturally designed home on the canal at Banksia Beach has sold for more than $1 million.Sales association at @realty Geoff Tutt sold the property at 42 Island Parade for $1.175 million late last month.It marks the Moreton region’s top sale to the week ended March 5.Mr Tutt said the four-bedroom property, which is on a 842sq m block, attracted a lot of interest from potential buyers.“Most of them were from interstate, including Tasmania, Sydney and Melbourne,” he said.A Tasmanian couple bought the house and wasted no time making it their home, moving in just days after the sale settled.More from newsLand grab sees 12 Sandstone Lakes homesites sell in a week21 Jun 2020Tropical haven walking distance from the surf9 Oct 201942 Island Parade, Banksia BeachMr Tutt said the warmer weather attracted them to the area.“The buyer originally came from the Rockhampton, Gladstone area,” he said.Mr Tutt said it was on the market for about eight months, but that wasn’t unusual for properties selling for more than $1 million.He said there was high demand for houses like these.“The $1 million to $1.2 million, there’s a lot of buyers there,” he said.“I’ve probably got two to three coming up in the next two weeks.”last_img read more

F&P insists consumer risk in Danish DC pensions is ‘very low’

first_imgThe risk that defined contribution pensions will result in a low pension for savers is “very small”, according to the Danish industry association for the pensions and insurance sector, Forsikring & Pension (F&P).F&P was responding to a regulatory investigation by the Danish Financial Supervisory Authority (FSA or Finanstilsynet).It presented a discussion paper at the beginning of March on the risks for consumers in “market-rate” pensions, whose returns are directly linked to underlying investments. Providers are increasingly offering savers these products instead of the traditional “average-rate” pensions with or without yield guarantees.In its response document – entitled “Good pensions with controlled risk” – F&P said: “It is important to make clear that even though the investment risk is greater in non-guaranteed products, the risk that the individual client will end up getting a low pension is only very small.” The association cited three reasons for this: First, it said pension providers limited investment risks by investing in many different asset types and individual assets. Second, pensions were a very long-term form of savings and downturns on financial markets were typically soon followed by upturns. Thirdly, it said pension providers usually reduced investment risk for customers the closer they came to pensionable age.Finanstilsynet said last month that the Danish pension system had undergone an huge change in the last few years with the transition from the traditional guaranteed products to market-rate products.It said the development was driven by the desire to give customers higher expected pensions, but also meant that the savers themselves shouldered the risk of whether there would be enough money for their years as a pensioner.Per Bremer Rasmussen, chief executive of F&P, said the association welcomed a businesslike debate on the subject raised by regulator.“It is important that the pensions industry, regulatory authorities, and Danish politicians continuously take positions on whether the Danish pensions system has the best conditions for providing Danes with the best possible pensions,” he said.But F&P said information currently available to customers with non-guaranteed pension products was not adequate, and this was why the industry was in the process of new initiatives on information.The association presented a four-point plan last month to promote consumer protection regarding pensions.“There is a lot of literature showing that the typical consumer finds it very difficult partly to understand risk, and partly to act in regard to managing that risk,” the association said in its response to the regulator’s specific questions. “So it is important to take as a starting point the consumer’s limited understanding and interest, when communicating on risk.”It was also important to give the individual pensions firm enough freedom to target and test the information for its specific customer segment, F&P said.last_img read more

Inside biggest sale of the past week on the Gold Coast

first_img28 Hampton Court, Sovereign Islands. 28 Hampton Court, Sovereign Islands. More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa14 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago28 Hampton Court, Sovereign Islands.Ms Wu said it was a record sale for a two-storey property on Sovereign Islands, with most properties three or more levels.“The buyers liked the position of the property and the ambience,” she said.Named La Vue, the property offers stunning 180 degree views from the Surfers Paradise skyline to the Coomera River.When you first step inside, a grand two-storey entrance featuring a chandelier captures your attention. That leads up to the large wrought iron staircase sitting below another exquisite chandelier. 28 Hampton Court, Sovereign Islands sold for $4.05 million.A SOVEREIGN Islands property has sold for $4.05 million, the highest sale on the Gold Coast over the past week.An interstate buyer bought the luxury mansion at 28 Hampton Court after a three-week marketing campaign by Ivy Wu and Issac Kim of Amir Mian Prestige Property Agents. center_img The residence has five bedrooms including a study, downstairs guest suite, upstairs children’s retreat and a media room with wet bar. The kitchen has a butler’s pantry and plenty of storage while outside, a teppanyaki kitchen with wood fired pizza oven in the courtyard offers another area to entertain. Other features include a 17m pool, Denon wireless home entertainment system and a main bedroom with a freestanding bath.The biggest sale on Sovereign Islands this year was a mega mansion on Sir Lancelot Close that traded for more than $11 million.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD576p576p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenWhy location is everything in real estate01:59 28 Hampton Court, Sovereign Islands.last_img read more