Jim Harbaugh’s Michigan Practice Playlist Features AC/DC, KISS, And His Surprising Favorite Song

first_imgHead coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines (L) jogs off the fiedl with his brother Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh (R) following halftime of the Michigan and Maryland Terrapins.COLLEGE PARK, MD – OCTOBER 03: Head coach Jim Harbaugh of the Michigan Wolverines (L) jogs off the fiedl with his brother Baltimore Ravens head coach John Harbaugh (R) following halftime of the Michigan and Maryland Terrapins game at Byrd Stadium on October 3, 2015 in College Park, Maryland. (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)Like many teams, Jim Harbaugh’s Michigan Wolverines listen to music during practice. Harbaugh’s inclusions in the playlist include many of the rock staples you’d expect from a 51 year old football coach. You have some AC/DC, some KISS, both very standard. The playlist also includes Jim Harbaugh’s favorite song, which doesn’t strike us as something you’d play to get players pumped for practice.What music does Jim Harbaugh play at #Michigan practices? pic.twitter.com/VzNpp6l3IH— Ben Fidelman (@bfidelman) September 6, 2015 Gordon Lightfoot’s song does have plenty of references to the Midwest. The shipwreck motif is a bit strange, but we probably shouldn’t question Harbaugh’s methods. The man rebuilt Stanford, he can play some Lightfoot if he wants.last_img read more

Which Winter Olympic Sports See The Most Wipeouts

Tianyu Han of China and Yuri Confortola of Italy, at right, crash during men’s 1,500-meter short track speedskating qualifying during the 2018 Winter Olympics. Richard Heathcote / Getty Images Perhaps surprisingly, the lightning-fast downhill discipline has skiing’s lowest rate of incidents, with only about 10 percent of runs going unfinished. That number would still be higher than any of the sports we looked at above, but it’s low compared with other familiar high-speed activities such as NASCAR (where 16 percent of individual races ended in a DNF last season) or Formula 1 (24 percent). Downhill takes tremendous speed, skill and courage, and we’ve all seen what can go wrong when a racer makes a mistake, but those moments are still rather few and far between by Alpine standards.DNFs and DQs become much more common, however, in disciplines featuring tighter turns and more gates — those pesky markers that a skier must navigate around to complete the course. Whatever the discipline, failing to send the tips of your skis (plus boots) inside of a gate will get you disqualified from the race.In the super giant slalom (or “super-G”), racers gather speeds comparable to those seen in downhill, but they also must make sharper cuts around more gates, which are bunched more closely together. (They also aren’t allowed practice sessions beforehand, which doesn’t help matters.) Between the men and women, only about 78 percent of Olympic super-G runs are completed cleanly.And super-G is not considered a “technical” skiing event. Giant slalom is, and it involves even more gates and more side-to-side turning. Since 1994, a third of Olympic giant slalom runs ended in DNF or DQ. But the ultimate tough-to-finish Alpine discipline is the standard slalom, with skiers zigzagging back and forth across the slope around pylon-like gates in rapid succession. Almost 50 percent of slalom runs fail to cross the finish line, a testament to the perfection required to clear every gate at world-class speed.Nothing in slalom is guaranteed. For instance, even in successful runs like the one that clinched the gold medal for the great U.S. racer Mikaela Shiffrin at the 2014 Olympics, disaster is always lurking around the next gate: At one point midrace, Shiffrin’s left ski lost contact with the ground, requiring an expert recovery to avert a missed gate — or worse. In addition to skeleton and bobsled, luge is another sport that seems prone to disaster, with its high speeds and steeply banked turns. However, roughly 96 percent of competitors end up finishing their runs unscathed, an even better rate than bobsledding can claim.4That doesn’t mean luge isn’t dangerous, of course. At the 2010 Olympics, amid concerns over an excessively quick course, Georgian luger Nodar Kumaritashvili died after a crash in practice. Short track speedskating, by comparison, has a more deserved reputation for mayhem, with nearly 9 percent of runs ending prematurely — though the list of offenses that can get you disqualified from a race is fairly lengthy. On the short track, crashes and chaos are features that add to the excitement.But the undisputed king of ending athletes’ races prematurely — and thus dashing gold-medal dreams — is Alpine skiing. Since 1994, nearly a third of all ski runs have ended without the racer actually crossing the finish line. And the breakdown within the sport varies pretty heavily by event: At the climax of everyone’s favorite bobsleigh-based film, 1993’s “Cool Runnings,” disaster strikes the upstart Jamaican team when its ricketty sled flips over during the final race. Everyone from Calgary to Jamaica fears the worst — but the teammates shake off the wreck, determined to finish the race. Together, they hoist up the sled on their shoulders, carrying it over the finish line. Cue that inspirational slow clap.It was a real thing that actually happened … well, aside from a few bits of artistic license. (For instance, they never carried the sled; the fact that all four racers walked away from the crash at all was remarkable enough, given how it looked in slow motion.) But one of bobsledding’s most iconic moments was also a total rarity. As far as Winter Olympic sports go, bobsled has one of the lowest rates of in-race mishaps, with racers completing roughly 95 percent of their runs. In other sports, by contrast, finishes aren’t anywhere near as guaranteed — we’re looking at you, Alpine skiing.To measure how often a run goes awry, we grabbed data from Sports-Reference.com’s Olympics site going back to 19941The year the Winter Olympics switched to its current cycle. for events in nine timed sports: skiing (Alpine and cross-country), skeleton, luge, bobsled, speedskating (short and long track), biathlon and Nordic combined. For each event, we tracked how often it ended in a DNF — “did not finish” — or a disqualification.To be sure, not every DNF or DQ represents a crash like the Jamaicans suffered in 1988.2Technically, they were disqualified for the wreck. For example, in skeleton (you know, the one where you slide face-first down an icy track at stomach-churning speeds), the only DNF or DQ happened not on the course but when Canadian racer Mike Douglas was late for a pre-race inspection.3It should be noted that, before 2002, skeleton had appeared in only two Olympics: 1928 and 1948. The sport was reintroduced to the Olympics in 2002. But DNFs and DQs do usually correlate with the difficulty in staying on course and avoiding spills, missed gates or other sources of misfortune.Since 1994, these are the winter sports with the lowest (and highest) rates of DNFs and DQs among the timed events in our data: Again, not every DNF or DQ is a crash, and research has shown that per-run injury rates are still highest in the speed disciplines (downhill and super-G) versus the technical ones (giant slalom and slalom). This jibes with common sense: Although it’s easy to get disqualified for missing a gate in slalom, those miscues don’t always result in terrifying crashes. Making a mistake at the speeds involved in downhill, on the other hand, can have more devastating consequences.All of this is worth keeping in mind while watching Olympic races over the next few weeks. Some of the most seemingly terrifying sports can actually rank among the lowest in terms of on-course incident rates — although what few mishaps there are tend to be quite dangerous. Meanwhile, anything can happen in the most technical skiing events. As it turns out, hurriedly weaving down an icy slope on skis is difficult to do without skipping a gate or crashing. Who knew?— Ella Koeze contributed research. read more

Football Dobbins Bosa named to Maxwell Award watch list

Ohio State junior linebacker Nick Bosa (97) runs a drill in warmups prior to the 2018 Spring Game in Ohio Stadium April 14. Gray beat Scarlet 37-14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Managing Editor for DesignAs the college football season inches closer, the expectations for Ohio State remain high for the team. For two players individually though, the high expectations are already set. Both junior defensive end Nick Bosa and sophomore running back J.K. Dobbins have been named to the preseason Maxwell Award watch list, given to college football’s player of the year at the end of the season. Along with the Maxwell Award watch list, Bosa was named to the preseason Bednarik Award watch list, given to the best defensive player in college football. Last season, the 6-foot-4, 263-pound defensive end was named as the Big Ten Smith-Brown Defensive Lineman of the Year, finishing second in the Big Ten in tackles for loss (16) and sacks (8). In his first season with the Buckeyes, Dobbins set the freshman rushing record with 1,403 yards and averaged 7.2 yards per carry, the second best for a back in school history. This earned the La Grange, Texas, native ESPN Freshman All-America honors as well as second-team All-Big Ten honors. In the school’s history, Ohio State has had a player win the Maxwell Award four times with running back Eddie George receiving the award last in 1995. An Ohio State defensive player has never won the Bednarik Award. read more

Arsene Wenger I will return to football in January

first_imgArsene Wenger has announced his plans to make a football comeback by January after receiving numerous enquiries from “all over the world”The Frenchman ended his 22-year spell in charge of Arsenal five months ago and had stated his intention to make a swift return to the game.However, following a good rest, Wenger is feeling re-energised and relishes the prospect of taking on a new challenge at this stage of his career.“I believe that I will start again on January 1st,” Wenger told SportBild.Jadon SanchoMerson believes Arsenal should sign Sancho Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Borussia Dortmund winger Jadon Sancho might be the perfect player to play for the Gunners, according to former England international Paul Merson.“From my 22 years at Arsenal, I have big experience on different levels. There are enquiries from all over the world.“There are associations, national teams, it could be in Japan.”On where he could possibly go now and what role he could take, Wenger added: “I feel rested and am ready to work again. But where? I don’t know yet.”The 68-year-old also gave his verdict on Mesut Ozil’s international retirement and how it could impact Arsenal.last_img read more

Prandelli satisfied with a point in debut game

first_imgCesare Prandelli has expressed his satisfaction in Genoa’s 1-1 draw with SPAL despite playing with ten men on his debut.Domenico Criscito was given the marching orders after just 11 minutes, swiftly followed by an Andrea Petagna opener for the visitors, but Krzysztof Piatek converted a penalty to equalise.“We could not have asked for much more when working together for only a couple of days. The only thing we could hope for was a show of character and we saw that this evening,” Prandelli told Football Italia.“Now we’ve got to get the team calm and focused.”Prandelli full of regrets as he leaves Genoa Taimoor Khan – June 20, 2019 Cesare Prandelli is not going to be at the dugout for Genoa next season and the former Italy boss admits that he has a…This was Prandelli’s first Serie A match in eight years, having worked as Italy CT, then abroad in Spain, Turkey, and Dubai.“I thank President Enrico Preziosi and the club for thinking of me. With great humility, I will give my best to help this team grow and improve.“I am convinced we can have a great season at Genoa. Now I want to get to know all the players before making any decisions on whether we need adjustments during the January transfer window.”last_img read more

Qualcomm introduces WiFi 6

first_img KUSI Newsroom Updated: 8:55 AM November 1, 2018 Categories: Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, center_img Qualcomm introduces Wi-Fi 6 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Qualcomm’s VP, Marketing Pete Lancia, joined Good Morning San Diego to explain Wi-Fi 6 and products using Wi-Fi 6 that will start hitting shelves in a matter of weeks.When it comes to internet connection on smartphones there have been generational improvements.Most people know the difference between 4GLTE network vs roaming on a 3G or even 2G network but for Wi-Fi networks there really hasn’t been a name for the difference in connection.Now Qualcomm said they’ve established a way of distinguishing between generations of Wi-Fi. Posted: November 1, 2018last_img read more